LESSONS FROM A FOREIGN LAND

foreign land

Lessons From a Foreign Land

One AM. Our plane touched down in Dushanbe, Tajikistan. We were all ushered into a cement block building to wait in line for passport control. One-by-one we were summoned into a small room to present our visas and answer a few questions. Small problem. I didn’t speak Farsi. I stood there, listening very carefully but not comprehending. Somehow the man behind the desk seemed satisfied with the documents and my affirming nods that he released me from his presence.

Outside the building and reunited with my traveling companions, I was caught up a flurry of activity. Porters were grabbing at our luggage trying to gain a few American dollars in their pockets. Owners of taxis crowded in demanding that we use their service. It all felt very confusing and a bit scary trying to make my way in a strange land in the dark of night.

Then a familiar face came into view. Our contact came toward us warning off the aggressive drivers. He grabbed the bags and motioned for us to follow. He guided us safely to a van that was waiting to transport us to our destination.

As the week played out, I learned many things about the culture I had been plopped in the middle of. Village life was quite different from the world I had left at home. For safety’s sake, an escort was needed wherever I went. I covered my hair so I would not find myself the topic of whispers and ridicule. Bathrooms were a challenge. Electricity was intermittent. Meals were served on the floor. Men and women did not socialize in public. There were military checkpoints, calls to worship, and houses hidden by high walls and locked gates.

Yes. Everything was different and if it had not been for my guide I would not have been able to navigate through the rules of this community. What I knew of life did not make sense in this culture. It was all so foreign.

In my current trek through Psalm 119, I came across a similar thought in the second segment of the book.

“Open my eyes so that I can truly see the marvelous things in your law. I am like a foreigner in this land. Do not hide your commandments from me. I desperately long to know your regulations at all times.” Psalm 119:18-20

Oh, how God’s ideas can seem strange to us. Like the Psalmist, it sometimes feels like we are in a foreign land when we are learning about God’s ways. What we knew of life is now turned upside down. The culture is new. The language seems odd. It isn’t always easy to wrap our minds around why things work better His way. We need Him to guide us. Then, little-by-little, we begin to see how the customs of this unfamiliar place start to make sense.  As we put into practice those marvelous things He reveals, they spare us from humiliation as they guide us to success. It’s beautiful when it starts to come together.

As for the rest of my time in the Tajik culture? Before my trip concluded, candlelight in the power outage became romantic. A glimpse of a married couple sharing a private conversation seemed mysterious and precious. Even the lessons in tying my head covering the right way or how to apply the perfect uni-brow [I have a photo somewhere.] made me feel more connected to the people of that country. I began to get it. Their ways worked in context with their culture. What seemed strange when I began my time there became normal and comfortable before I left.  Foreign no more—Tajikistan, its people, and their ways occupy a place in my heart that brings great joy each time my thoughts wander there.


Today’s post was written by my dear friend, Patty Schell. Patty pic for bio

Patty Schell is a woman who has quite a hat collection. Her jobs include keeper of the home, creator of beautiful things, and cooker of much yumminess. But, the role she enjoys the most is a student of the Bible.  Patty currently serves at her local church as an encourager of women, challenging them to embrace this journey called Life and live it God’s way. She is a contributor to online magazines Refresh, Life Letter Café, Be New Today and ALTARWORK, and currently working on a Bible study called Legacy: Living NOW for Future Generations.  On weekends, Patty and her husband become builders of loft houses for the needy in Mexico. She is a mother to three grown daughters and grandmother to ten grandchildren. Yes, Patty does wear a lot of hats, but wouldn’t have it any other way. Following God takes you on the best adventures. You can read more from her on her blog: Girl on Adventure at girlonadventure.com  or her food blog at theparty’sinthekitchen

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9 thoughts on “LESSONS FROM A FOREIGN LAND

    • Ryan, how wonderful that you will be visiting Tajikistan! God is so good to lead you to read this guest-post by my dear friend, Patty. I’m glad it was a blessing to you.
      Safe travels and God bless!

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  1. This was really great, Patty! I needed it right now. As long as I’ve known Jesus, I’m still learning his foreign truths, and it makes my head spin! I’ve lived around the world, in different countries, so I know exactly what you’re talking about, with getting more comfortable and used to different mannerisms in a different culture over time. It’s really kind of challenging and fun, just like it is when we get to know more about God and His ways! Thank you for guest posting this, Beckie! 😊

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks for sharing Patty’s post, Beckie– it brought back memories of a couple of trips to Kazakhstan, and the insights were important to consider, especially as our culture grows increasingly diverse and the clashes between ideologies escalate. Thanks again for your faithful ministry.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ron, it’s an honor to have Patty’s beautiful writing here on Spotlight. I’m glad you enjoyed it. Hmm, maybe at some point you’d like to share one of your wonderful posts here? Think about it. I’m sure readers would love it!

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